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Posts Tagged ‘support’

So when you saw the title of this post, did you really think I was going to post my “Before” photos here in all of my XL glory?  Seriously?  HA HA HA HA  No.

But here’s the idea: 

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Now please, before you go reading anything into this cartoon, please know I just snagged it from google images (credit given) because the lady still looked cute, even for a big girl.  Kinda like me.  So I appreciate her struggles, even though she is, well, a cartoon.

The thing is, I DID just take some super-duper-top-secret “BEFORE” photos.  I’m getting ready to start something new this Monday and I’m certain that the last quarter of 2010 is going to yield awesome results for me physically!  The Before Photos will be my evidence of how far I’ve come. 

But I am most certainly NOT going to be sharing those “Before” Pics here unless I’ve got some hottie “After” Pics of myself to post along side them.  This will take time, effort, and cooperation from my metabolism.

If you want to know why most people don’t embark on these weight-loss odysseys that require photographic evidence, I have a theory. 

I do NOT think the problem is not wanting to face one’s blubbery image on the screen.  I do NOT think the problem is embarrassment of the throngs of curiousity-seekers who might ogle at your photo like some sort of freak in a carnival tent. 

No, I’m pretty confident that the Real Issue is that Before Photos are NOT a one-person job.  There is another person clicking away at the camera to capture all that voluptuousness.  In theory, this photographer is an encourager, someone who you trust.  But the Before Photo is where theory meets reality. 

It’s ugly, people.  In so many ways.

I shall illustrate.

My photographic helpers were daughters Ninja (11 year-old tomboy) and Princess (10 year-old girlie girl). 

Princess:  Mom, you don’t look that fat.  You look cute.

Ninja:  You don’t look fat at all Mom.  (pause)  *giggle*

Me:  What?

Ninja:  (collecting herself)  No.  You look great Mom. 

Princess:  It’s just that we’re not used to seeing you with, you know, THAT (points to my XL belly sticking out between the bottom of my bright yellow running bra and the waist of my black compression shorts.)

Me:  Yes, I usually try to be more modest.  It’s not like I’m going to be wearing this get-up out at…

Princess:  (interrupting)  No, really Mom.  It’s not that you look like a hootchie or anything.  It’s just that I had no idea your belly was so…

Ninja:  (cutting her off)  Let’s take the pictures, now.  (clicks away at camera)  Okay, turn to the side now.

Me:  (turning) Like this?

Ninja:  Sure.  Yeah, Yes…Yes…  ACK!  WOW!  Oh Mom, I had no idea. 

(Princess flees from hallway photography studio, possibly in fear, possibly to avoid being caught laughing at mama.)

Me:  Nice.  Did you get the stinking picture?

Ninja:  Yeah, Mom.  Here’s your camera. 

Me:  (looking at the photos)  Ugh.  I have my work cut out for me.  Thanks for your help, girls.

Princess:  (peeking back around the corner)  You really do look cute, Mom.

Ninja:  In a silly kind of way.

Princess:  Yes, “silly.”  That’s it exactly.

Me:  (muttering to myself as I head away from the camera crew, who I imagine is now dissolving into a fit of giggles) I guess the whole experience could have been worse.

Helpful Husband:  (from the next room) What experience?

Exactly.

So this is exactly why most people do NOT put themselves through the ordeal of those Before Photos. 

Marathon training?  No problem. 

Intense cardio?  Awesome.

Strength training from hell?  Bring it. 

They are small potatoes compared to the ordeal of the Before Photos. 

But I figure if you can make it through the Before Photo ordeal, then everything else is downhill from there! 

Check back with me on December 31, and I’ll tell you whether it was worth it!  🙂

 [UPDATE:] 

Helpful Husband has now been exposed to this blog post.  After laughing hysterically–a little too loud and long, I might add–he asks, “When did this happen?  Was it here?  Was I here?  Really?” 

“A couple weeks ago.  Yes.  Yes.  And yes.”  Hard stare at HH.

Long pause while HH ponders whether he would have been in more trouble if he’d been involved during the infamous photo shoot than he is for being so very unaware. 

Again, I say, it could have been worse!

 

 

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I’m 64 days away from the 26.2 with Donna starting line and I’m possibly starting to freak out, just a teensy little bit…

I’m just wondering, if you have ever run a marathon, if you had similar experience to me while training for my first one… 

See, for the first time, yesterday, my training run was over half the distance of my final race.  And I happened to notice when I finished it, that the training run had SO kicked my fanny.  Seriously.  I had the fleeting thought that if this run was so exhausting, how on earth was I going to run 26.2 miles and finish it EVER and in ANY condition, let alone in the time limit and without medical attention.

I’ve heard that there’s a portion of the training where your mind sometimes plays tricks on you, but if you stick with the program and get those long runs in on the weekends, that you absolutely CAN and WILL finish the race.  Frankly, I’m counting on that.  Kinda like I imagine a pilot relies on his instruments to fly when it’s dark.  ‘Cause I don’t even know what I don’t know.  I’m just trusting that the plan will work if I work the plan. 

I’ve also heard that the training comes together in the end.  That the race, while grueling, if you’ve trained well, can be conquered.  Relying on that too.

Would love to hear some wisdom from marathoners (or 1/2 marathoners, or ultra runners, or triathletes…) who can still remember their First Big Race and possibly had thoughts during the training as to whether they’d be able to get to that finish line.   And maybe there are some other novice runners out there that are having their own little freak-out sessions.  Your pearls of wisdom will help them out too! 

Thanks in advance for your wisdom and encouragement!  🙂

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If you’re not from around these parts, you’re probably wondering, “What in the world is a Kennekuk?”  Excellent question.  Here is my answer.  “Kennekuk” is several different, very awesome things. 

Most widely understood, it’s one of our local county parks that is absolutely amazing.  If you’re a nature person or a trail person or a enjoy-the-peace-and-serenity-of-the-prairie person, then this park is for you and you owe it to yourself to visit there.  A lot.  If you’re not from the area, it’s worth the drive to visit.  A lot. 

Kennekuk can also refer to the Native American Kickapoo leader for whom (I believe) the park was named.  If you’re a history person, this will interest you.   A lot.

Most germane to this blog, Kennekuk refers to the Greatest Running Club in the Universe.   If you’re a runner, this group will inspire, entertain, challenge, support, amuse, encourage, and amaze you.  A lot.

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I first became involved with the Kennekuk Road Runners when I ran in the Memorial Day 5K that my friend Chris suckered me into running.  This was such a well run race and people were so nice and encouraging, it was a very easy step to try the next race.  Since it was members-only, I bit the bullet and joined the group with its Most-Affordable-Family-Membership-Fee-Ever

The first member race which followed shortly was the Clear Pond Trail Run.  The organization raised money for local animal shelters during this event, which was a see-how-far-you-can-run-in-five-hours-you-crazy-person event.  I’ll give you my observations and experiences on the Clear Pond Trail Run in a separate post, I promise.

This group of people is highly organized and professional.  They work very hard.  And they have a great time at everything they do.  People from around the nation have joined this organization for these and other awesome reasons. 

Personally, the thing I found to be amazing was that in this brief time running near the very back of the pack with these amazing runners, they were amazing enough people that they took the time to be incredibly welcoming and encouraging, not just about their club, but also about the sport of running. 

They’re the first ones to tell someone, “Good job!  Keep it up!” when you know that your lumbering, staggering pace is not a “good job” in anyone’s wildest imagination.  Yet, somehow, while you’re out there running, these people’s positive opinions and encouragement actually matters to you and urge you forward, with the great anticipation of finishing the race on your feet. 

And the fact is, each one of these people started somewhere.  Some were awesome athletes all their lives, I suppose.  And then there are my kindred spirits: a group of them who decided to pull their acts together at some point in their lives and do the Hard Work of getting back in shape after years of neglect.  They know that getting started is a “good job” and your first run is a “good job” and any personal record is a “good job” and that there are days when just plain not quitting is a “good job.” 

The bottom line is, they’ve been there.  And they haven’t forgotten the journey to where they are now.  And they’re happy to be a voice of encouragement to someone else starting down that path.   Hearing their voices sure helped me to remember that my own “good job” had a great deal more to do with showing up and trying than with finishing in any particular place or time.  And for me, that support was something I desperately needed to stick with the sport in the beginning stages. 

These superstars give time and encouragement and, yes, respect for anyone willing to lace up their shoes and come out and run, no matter what that newbie’s fitness level or experience.  They are ready to celebrate your “good job” with you, whatever that looks like, and without comparing it to the next guy (that one who lapped you four times, yeah, him). 

As a mama, I’m used to being the expert in lots of things.  I’m used to being the one doing the encouraging.  So it was an extra bonus to hear that atta-girl coming my way as I hauled myself over those courses and on those trails. 

Thanks Kennekuk Road Runners.  Yeah, I definitely wanna be like them when I grow up.  🙂

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